Meetings No 19
Intro
Artificial Intelligence
Atti Soenarso: AI is soon an everyday commodity.
Cover Story
Anders Sörman-Nilsson
Gazing into the future of the meetings industry.
Intermission
Europe is not a market
It is the will to live together.
Radar
Swedish Exhibition & Congress Centre
“Our vision is to create Europe’s most attractive venue.”
ROI
Padraic Gilligan
Why ROI for meetings and incentives is a waste of time.
ROI
Elling Hamso
Why ROI is not a waste of time.
Radar
ICC Sydney
An important contributor to innovation.
Strategy
PCMA
Radar on penetrating the ­European meetings industry.
HR Technology
The Rise of AI
Rohit Talwar and Alexandra Whittington: On AI and HR.
Sustainable Growth
GDS-Index
Scandinavian sustainability initiative expands.
Intermission
In a Hole
Lending a hand.
Radar
ICCA
Record number of association meetings in 2016.
Collaboration
Best Cities Global Forum
“Unlocking the collective intelligence.”
Sharma
My 23 Best Tactics for Personal Greatness
Robin Sharma: “Protect your willpower.”
Radar
Technology and Meetings
Tech is key in creating purposeful meetings.
Radar
IMEX Frankfurt
Packed with opportunities.
Cyber Security
The Anti-Cloud
Jaak Geens and Linas Bukauskas on geens.com.
Kellerman
Cyber vs. Personal
Roger Kellerman: “Now is the time to improve online security.”
classifieds
news
the convention industry
Paris back as number one
in the city rankings for international congresses.
Africa Meetings
Africa Rising
in the ICCA statistic 2016.
business Intelligence
Saudi Arabia to launch into MICE sector
worldwide by exhibiting at IMEX in Frankfurt.
New position
Aoife Delaney
new Director of Marketing and Sales at DMC Network.
Redefining meetings
Sarawak goes tribal
to boost business.
Hotel world
Asias ultimate destination,
Signiel Seoul Hotel opens in the worlds new landmark.
Business Intelligence
Ottawa Tourism
sees large business events bookings up 220% in Canada’s 150th year.
meetings creates events, events creates meetings
Swedish Exhibition and Congress Centre
in Gothenburg speeds up plans to extend facilities.
Aviation Industry
Swedish Aviation Tax to Cost 7,500 Jobs,
Conflicts with Global Carbon Agreement.
NEW
Successful trials lead IMEX in Frankfurt
to fully-fledged roll out of Zenvoy networking service.
Links
Sponsor Logo
Sponsor Logo
Sponsor Logo
Sponsor Logo
Sponsor Logo
Sponsor Logo
Sponsor Logo
Sponsor Logo
AI Is Soon an Everyday Commodity

The products and services on show at this year’s Consumer Electronics Show (CES 2017) (3,800 exhibitors in Las Vegas at the beginning of the year), covered nearly all global industries. From the latest in Artificial Intelligence (AI), Augmented Reality (AR), Virtual Reality (VR), smart homes, self-propelled vehicles, robotics, wearables, health and fitness tech and more, CES 2017 reveals the future of the online experience and what it means today. But above all what it will mean to consumers around the world within five to ten years. Things are developing at a rapid pace.

The main attraction of this year’s CES was Alexa and Google Home, inclusive of voice-activated light switches, thermostats, gearboxes, cars and much more. You can ask Alexa to do hundreds of things, like play your favourite tunes by your favourite artist, set a timer on ten minutes or wake you up at 7:00. You can also ask it to tell you a joke or ask how high Mount Everest is. We have finally reached a stage where “she” understands and answers in an exact and natural voice. Google has also recently announced the availability of Alexa through their iPhone app.

This voice interface proved to be simple and natural, and in many cases more convenient than typing in a search engine, turning on an app or getting up to turn a power switch on or off. Artificial Intelligence is quickly moving into our daily lives and even event companies are beginning to use AI in their products. For example, Grip.events uses AI to match members of a network with a Tinder-like typeface.

Futuristic Elon Musk is known for his strong ideas and says that artificial intelligence will become an ever-important factor in our lives. When speaking at the World Government Summit in Dubai earlier this year, where he also launched Tesla in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), he said that over time, we will probably see a closer merging of biological intelligence and digital intelligence.

“It’s about bandwidth, the speed of the connection between your brain and the digital version of yourself, especially the output.” He explained what he meant by saying that computers could communicate with a trillion bits per second, while people, whose main method of communication is texting on a mobile, maybe at ten characters per second − if they are extremely fast.

“If the use of AI continues to expand at the present rate it could render many people useless, so we need to go arm in arm with the machines.”

Parallel with this issue of the magazine we have penned a Meetings International Business Intelligence Report from Vilnius in Lithuania, a country with a population of three million that is experiencing rapid development in the areas of cyber security, laser and nanotechnology, games development and, not least, VR, in which they are world leaders together with Facebook and Google. You do not have to come from the United States to be well-educated, smart and successful in the new technologies.